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A Bit on Buttons

Here’s three recent things that have come across my desk in recent days regarding buttons. One, an accessibility flub that needed to be fixed. Two, an article about the fundamental differences between links and buttons but how they can look too similar for our own good. Three, the logical extreme of the button element: never use them outside of forms unless injected with JavaScript.


A Bit on Buttons is a post from CSS-Tricks

Getting Nowhere on Job Titles

Last week on ShopTalk, Dave and I spoke with Mandy Michael and Lara Schenck. Mandy had just written the intentionally provocative “Is there any value in people who cannot write JavaScript?” which guided our conversation. Lara is deeply interested in this subject as well, as someone who is a job seeking web worker, but places herself on the spectrum as a non-unicorn.

Part of that discussion was about job titles. If there was a ubiquitously accepted and used …


Getting Nowhere on Job Titles is a post from CSS-Tricks

Prettier + Stylelint: Writing Very Clean CSS (Or, Keeping Clean Code is a Two-Tool Game)

It sure is nice having a whole codebase that is perfectly compliant to a set of code style guidelines. All the files use the same indentation, the same quote style, the same spacing and line-break rules, heck, tiny things like the way zero’s in values are handled and how keyframes are named.

It seems like a tall order, but these days, it’s easier than ever. It seems to me it’s become a two-tool game:

  1. A tool to automatically fix easy-to-fix


Prettier + Stylelint: Writing Very Clean CSS (Or, Keeping Clean Code is a Two-Tool Game) is a post from CSS-Tricks

I haven’t experienced imposter syndrome, and maybe you haven’t either

In recent years it’s become trendy to discuss how we all apparently suffer from this imposter syndrome – an inability to internalize one’s accomplishments and a persistent fear of being exposed as a “fraud”.

I take two issues with this:

  • it minimizes the impact that this experience has on people that really do suffer from it.
  • we’re labelling what should be considered positive personality traits – humility, an acceptance that we can’t be right all the time, a desire to


I haven’t experienced imposter syndrome, and maybe you haven’t either is a post from CSS-Tricks

On-Site Search

CSS-Tricks is a WordPress site. WordPress has a built-in search feature, but it isn’t tremendously useful. I don’t blame it, really. Search is a product onto itself and WordPress is a CMS company, not a search company.

You know how you can make a really powerful search engine for your site?

Here you go:

<form action="https://google.com/search" target="_blank" type="GET">

<input type=”search” name=”q”>
<input type=”submit” value=”search”>

</form>

Just a smidge of JavaScript trickery to enforce the site it searches:

var form


On-Site Search is a post from CSS-Tricks

Wufoo

(This is a sponsored post.)

When asked “Why Wufoo?” they say:

Because you’re busy and want your form up and running yesterday.

Wufoo is a form builder that not only makes it fast and easy to build a form so you really can get it up and running in just minutes, but also has all the power you need. What makes forms hard are things like preventing spam, adding logic, making them mobile friendly, and integrating what you collect …


Wufoo is a post from CSS-Tricks

You can get pretty far in making a slider with just HTML and CSS

A “slider”, as in, a bunch of boxes set in a row that you can navigate between. You know what a slider is. There are loads of features you may want in a slider. Just as one example, you might want the slider to be swiped or scrolled. Or, you might not want that, and to have the slider only respond to click or tappable buttons that navigate to slides. Or you might want both. Or you might want to …


You can get pretty far in making a slider with just HTML and CSS is a post from CSS-Tricks

Let There Be Peace on CSS

Cristiano Rastelli:

In the last few months there’s been a growing friction between those who see CSS as an untouchable layer in the “separation of concerns” paradigm, and those who have simply ignored this golden rule and have found different ways to style the UI, typically applying CSS styles via JavaScript.

He does a great job of framing the “problem”, exploring the history, and pointing to things that make this seem rather war-like, including one of my own!

As Cristiano …


Let There Be Peace on CSS is a post from CSS-Tricks

CSS-Tricks Chronicle XXXII

Hey y’all! Time for a quick Chronicle post where I get to touch on and link up some of the happenings around the site that I haven’t gotten to elsewhere.


Technologically around here, there have been a few small-but-interesting changes.

Site search is and has been powered by Algolia the last few months. I started up writing some thoughts about that here, and it got long enough I figured I’d crack it off into it’s own blog post, so look …


CSS-Tricks Chronicle XXXII is a post from CSS-Tricks

REST versus GraphQL

I think the jury is in: GraphQL is a winner for developers consuming APIs. We format a request for the exact data we want, and the endpoint coughs it up. What might have been multiple API requests and manually stitching together data, is now one in just the format we want.

I’ve heard less about whether GraphQL is ideal for the providers of those APIs. I imagine it’s far easier to cache the results at specific URL’s with a REST …


REST versus GraphQL is a post from CSS-Tricks