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Getting Around a Revoked Certificate in OSX

Let me start this off by saying this is not an ideal trick and one I hope no one else needs to use because it’s a bad idea to work around a browser feature that’s aimed to protect your security.

That said, I am in the process of testing a product and ran into a weird situation where our team had to revoke the SSL certificate we had assigned to our server. We’re going to replace it but I have …


Getting Around a Revoked Certificate in OSX is a post from CSS-Tricks

Breaking down CSS Box Shadow vs. Drop Shadow

Drop shadows. Web designers have loved them for a long time to the extent that we used to fake them with PNG images before CSS Level 3 formally introduced them to the spec as the box-shadow property. I still reach for drop shadows often in my work because they add a nice texture in some contexts, like working with largely flat designs.

Not too long after box-shadow was introduced, a working draft for CSS Filters surfaced and, with it, a …


Breaking down CSS Box Shadow vs. Drop Shadow is a post from CSS-Tricks

Screen Readers and CSS: Are We Going Out of Style (and into Content)?

The big takeaway in this post is that screen readers do not always read content the way it is styled in CSS. Toss in the fact that not all screen readers speak or read markup the same way and that there are differences in how they render content in different browsers and the results become…well different. Kind of like cross-browser testing CSS, but with speech.

The key points:

  • Different screen reader/browser pairings behave differently
  • DOM order is everything
  • Containers are


Screen Readers and CSS: Are We Going Out of Style (and into Content)? is a post from CSS-Tricks

The average web page is 3MB. How much should we care?

Tammy Everts with a deep dive into the average page size, which seems to grow year in and year out.

It’s a little perplexing that the average page size trends up each year as performance has become a growing concern on the forefront of our minds, but Tammy has keen insights that are worth reading because she suggests that user experience isn’t always about page size and that bloat is far from the only metric we should be concerned.

Correlating …


The average web page is 3MB. How much should we care? is a post from CSS-Tricks

6 Months of Working Remotely Taught Me a Thing or Ten

Peter Anglea writes up his key takeaways after six months on the job with a new front-end position. His points ring true to me as a remote worker and the funny thing is that each one of the suggestions is actually applicable to anyone in almost any front-end job, whether it happens to be in-house or remote.

The full post is worth reading, though the list breaks down to:

  1. Be as available as possible
  2. Communicate clearly
  3. Go out of your


6 Months of Working Remotely Taught Me a Thing or Ten is a post from CSS-Tricks

Custom Elements Everywhere

Custom Elements Everywhere is a site created by Rob Dodson. It displays the results of a set of tests that check JS frameworks that use Custom Elements and Shadow DOM for interoperability issues.

It could look like a report card at first glance, but the description at the top of the site nicely sums up the goal of comparing frameworks:

This project runs a suite of tests against each framework to identify interoperability issues, and highlight potential fixes already …


Custom Elements Everywhere is a post from CSS-Tricks

When Design Becomes Part of the Code Workflow

I recently did an experiment where I created the same vector illustration in three different applications, exported the illustration as SVG in each application, then wrote a post comparing the exported code.

While I loved the banter and insights that came in the comments, I was surprised that the bulk of conversation was centered on the file size of the compiled SVG.

I wasn’t surprised because performance and SVG do not go hand-in-hand or that performance isn’t the sort of …


When Design Becomes Part of the Code Workflow is a post from CSS-Tricks

Breaking the Grid

If you thought CSS Grid solves issues where overflowed content escaping the confines of a horizontal layout, then think again. Dave Rupert writes up two ways he unintentionally broke outside the grid and how he wrangled things back into place.

As a Front-End developer nothing bothers me more than seeing an unexpected horizontal scrollbar on a website. While building out a checkout layout with CSS Grid I was surprised to find something mysterious was breaking the container. I thought Grid …


Breaking the Grid is a post from CSS-Tricks

For the love of God, please tell me what your company does

Kasper Kubica goes on a humorous rant about the way companies describe themselves on their websites:

More and more often, upon discovering a new company or product, I visit their website hoping to find out what it is they do, but instead get fed a mash of buzzwords about their “team” and “values”. And this isn’t a side dish — this is the main entrée of these sites, with a coherent explanation of the company’s products or services rarely occupying …


For the love of God, please tell me what your company does is a post from CSS-Tricks