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It All Started With Emoji: Color Typography on the Web

“Typography on the web is in single color: characters are either black or red, never black and red …Then emoji hit the scene, became part of Unicode, and therefore could be expressed by characters — or “glyphs” in font terminology. The smiley, levitating businessman and the infamous pile of poo became true siblings to letters, numbers and punctuation marks.”

Roel Nieskens

Using emojis in code is easy. Head over to emojipedia and copy and paste one in.

In …

The post It All Started With Emoji: Color Typography on the Web appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

It All Started With Emoji: Color Typography on the Web

“Typography on the web is in single color: characters are either black or red, never black and red …Then emoji hit the scene, became part of Unicode, and therefore could be expressed by characters — or “glyphs” in font terminology. The smiley, levitating businessman and the infamous pile of poo became true siblings to letters, numbers and punctuation marks.”

Roel Nieskens

Using emojis in code is easy. Head over to emojipedia and copy and paste one in.

In …

The post It All Started With Emoji: Color Typography on the Web appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Finger-friendly numerical inputs with `inputmode`

Forms are often a nightmare on mobile. We can make the process as pain-free as possible by reacting to context. Input fields that expect numerical values should have a numerical UI. Bringing up a number keyboard on small screens is easy on most platforms — just use a <input type="number">.

This big button numeric keyboard is finger-friendly and will help prevent users bouncing from your form in frustration. However, type="number" isn’t appropriate for all numbers.

On …

The post Finger-friendly numerical inputs with `inputmode` appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Three Techniques for Performant Custom Font Usage

There’s a lot of good news in the world of web fonts!

  1. The forthcoming version of Microsoft Edge will finally implement unicode-range, the last modern browser to do so.
  2. Preload and font-display are landing in Safari and Firefox.
  3. Variable fonts are shipping everywhere.

Using custom fonts in a performant way is becoming far easier. Let’s take a peek at some things we can do when using custom fonts to make sure we’re being as performant as we can be.…

The post Three Techniques for Performant Custom Font Usage appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

The latest ways to deal with the cascade, inheritance and specificity

The cascade is such an intrinsic part of CSS that they put it right there in the name. If you’ve ever needed to use !important to affect specificity in the cascade, you’ll know that it can be a tricky thing to deal with. In the early days of CSS, it was common to see highly specific selectors like this:

#sidebar ul li {}

We’re all much better at managing specificity nowadays. It’s a widely accepted best practice to keep specificity …


The latest ways to deal with the cascade, inheritance and specificity is a post from CSS-Tricks

The latest ways to deal with the cascade, inheritance and specificity

The cascade is such an intrinsic part of CSS that they put it right there in the name. If you’ve ever needed to use !important to affect specificity in the cascade, you’ll know that it can be a tricky thing to deal with. In the early days of CSS, it was common to see highly specific selectors like this:

#sidebar ul li {}

We’re all much better at managing specificity nowadays. It’s a widely accepted best practice to keep specificity …


The latest ways to deal with the cascade, inheritance and specificity is a post from CSS-Tricks

On the Growing Popularity of Atomic CSS

Even if you consider yourself a CSS expert, chances are that at some point on a large project you’ve had to deal with a convoluted, labyrinthine stylesheet that never stops growing. Some stylesheets can feel like a messy entangled web of inheritance.

Spaghetti Monster

The cascade is incredibly powerful. Small changes can have large effects, making it harder to know what the immediate consequences will be. Refactoring, changing, and removing CSS is seen as risky and approached with trepidation as …


On the Growing Popularity of Atomic CSS is a post from CSS-Tricks

(Now More Than Ever) You Might Not Need jQuery

The DOM and native browser API’s have improved by leaps and bounds since jQuery’s release all the way back in 2006. People have been writing “You Might Not Need jQuery” articles since 2013 (see this classic site and this classic repo). I don’t want to rehash old territory, but a good bit has changed in browser land since the last You Might Not Need jQuery article you might have stumbled upon. Browsers continue to implement new APIs that take …


(Now More Than Ever) You Might Not Need jQuery is a post from CSS-Tricks

CSS Animations vs Web Animations API

There is a native API for animation in JavaScript known as the Web Animations API. We’ll call it WAAPI in this post. MDN has good documentation on it, and Dan Wilson has a great article series.

In this article, we’ll compare WAAPI and animations done in CSS.

A note on browser support

WAAPI has a comprehensive and robust polyfill, making it usable in production today, even while browser support is limited.

As ever, you can check Can I


CSS Animations vs Web Animations API is a post from CSS-Tricks