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Accessible Web Apps with React, TypeScript, and AllyJS

Accessibility is an aspect of web development that is often overlooked. I would argue that it is as vital as overall performance and code reusability. We justify our endless pursuit of better performance and responsive design by citing the users, but ultimately these pursuits are done with the user’s device in mind, not the user themselves and their potential disabilities or restrictions.

A responsive app should be one that delivers its content based on the needs of the user, not


Accessible Web Apps with React, TypeScript, and AllyJS is a post from CSS-Tricks

How to Disable Links

The topic of disabling links popped up at my work the other day. Somehow, a “disabled” anchor style was added to our typography styles last year when I wasn’t looking. There is a problem though: there is no real way to disable an <a> link (with a valid href attribute) in HTML. Not to mention, why would you even want to? Links are the basis of the web.

At a certain point, it looked like my co-workers were not going …


How to Disable Links is a post from CSS-Tricks

Simple Patterns for Separation (Better Than Color Alone)

Color is pretty good for separating things. That’s what your basic pie chart is, isn’t it? You tell the slices apart by color. With enough color contrast, you might be OK, but you might be even better off (particularly where accessibility is concerned) using patterns, or a combination.

Patrick Dillon tackled the Pie Chart thing

Enhancing Charts With SVG Patterns:

When one of the slices is filled with something more than color, it’s easier to figure out [who the …


Simple Patterns for Separation (Better Than Color Alone) is a post from CSS-Tricks

ARIA is Spackle, Not Rebar

Much like their physical counterparts, the materials we use to build websites have purpose. To use them without understanding their strengths and limitations is irresponsible. Nobody wants to live in an poorly-built house. So why are poorly-built websites acceptable?

In this post, I’m going to address WAI-ARIA, and how misusing it can do more harm than good.

Materials as technology

In construction, spackle is used to fix minor defects on interiors. It is a thick paste that dries into …


ARIA is Spackle, Not Rebar is a post from CSS-Tricks

Best Way to Programmatically Zoom a Web Application

Website accessibility has always been important, but nowadays, when we have clear standards and regulations from governments in most countries, it’s become even more crucial to support those standards and make our projects as accessible as they can be.

The W3C recommendation provides 3 level of conformance: A, AA and AAA. To be at the AA level, among other requirements, we have to provide a way to increase the site’s font size:

1.4.4 Resize text: Except for captions


Best Way to Programmatically Zoom a Web Application is a post from CSS-Tricks

Removing that ugly :focus ring (and keeping it too)

David Gilbertson:

Removing the focus outline is like removing the wheelchair ramp from a school because it doesn’t fit in with the aesthetic.

So David shows how you can remove it unless you detect that the user is tabbing, then show it. Essentially you add “user-is-tabbing” class to the body when you detect the tabbing, and use that class to remove the focus styles if it’s not there (plus handle the edge cases).

Direct Link to ArticlePermalink


Removing that ugly :focus ring (and keeping it too) is a post from CSS-Tricks

Empathy Prompts

Activities to help you develop empathy for the variety of people that use your thing. Eric Bailey:

This project is geared towards anyone involved with making digital products. It is my hope that this reaches both:

  • People who are not necessarily involved in the day-to-day part of the process, but who help shape things like budget, timeline, and scope, and
  • People who work every day to help to give these products shape and form

These prompts are intended to help …


Empathy Prompts is a post from CSS-Tricks

How Can I Make My Icon System Accessible?

Here’s a question I got the other day?

Would you suggest icon fonts or inline SVGs for a complex single page application? And are there specific accessibility concerns for either? Accessibility is especially important for us because schools use our products. I ask because we are currently in the process of unifying and setting up an icon system.

I don’t think I would make the choice based on what “kind” of website I was building, so let’s ignore that part …


How Can I Make My Icon System Accessible? is a post from CSS-Tricks

User Facing State

Let’s talk about state. Communicating state to the user that is, not application stores state in JavaScript objects, or localStorage. We’re going to be talking about how to let our users know about state (think: whether a button is disabled or not, or if a panel is active or not), and how we can use CSS for that. We’re not going to be using inline styles, or, as much as can be helped, class selectors, for reasons that will …


User Facing State is a post from CSS-Tricks

Mobile, Small, Portrait, Slow, Interlace, Monochrome, Coarse, Non-Hover, First

A month ago I explored the importance of relying on Interaction Media Features to identify the user’s ability to hover over elements or to detect the accuracy of their pointing device, meaning a fine pointer like a mouse or a coarse one like a finger.

But it goes beyond the input devices or the ability to hover; the screen refresh rate, the color of the screen, or the orientation. Making assumptions about these factors based on the width of the …


Mobile, Small, Portrait, Slow, Interlace, Monochrome, Coarse, Non-Hover, First is a post from CSS-Tricks