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Short note on what CSS display properties do to table semantics

We’ve blogged about responsive tables a number of times over the years. There’s a variety of techniques, and which you choose should be based on the data in the table and the UX you’re going for. But many of them rely upon resetting a table element’s natural display value to something else, for example display: block. Steve Faulkner warns us:

When CSS display: block or display: grid or display: flex is set on the table element, bad things happen. …

The post Short note on what CSS display properties do to table semantics appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

ARIA is Spackle, Not Rebar

Much like their physical counterparts, the materials we use to build websites have purpose. To use them without understanding their strengths and limitations is irresponsible. Nobody wants to live in an poorly-built house. So why are poorly-built websites acceptable?

In this post, I’m going to address WAI-ARIA, and how misusing it can do more harm than good.

Materials as technology

In construction, spackle is used to fix minor defects on interiors. It is a thick paste that dries into …


ARIA is Spackle, Not Rebar is a post from CSS-Tricks

Managing State in CSS with Reusable JavaScript Functions – Part 2

In my previous article, which shall now retroactively be known as Managing State in CSS with Reusable JavaScript Functions – Part 1, we created a powerful reusable function which allows us to quickly add, remove and toggle stateful classes via click.

One of the reasons I wanted to share this approach was to see what kind of response it would generate. Since then I’ve received some interesting feedback from other developers, with some raising valid shortcomings about this approach …


Managing State in CSS with Reusable JavaScript Functions – Part 2 is a post from CSS-Tricks