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A Bit on Buttons

Here’s three recent things that have come across my desk in recent days regarding buttons. One, an accessibility flub that needed to be fixed. Two, an article about the fundamental differences between links and buttons but how they can look too similar for our own good. Three, the logical extreme of the button element: never use them outside of forms unless injected with JavaScript.


A Bit on Buttons is a post from CSS-Tricks

Getting Nowhere on Job Titles

Last week on ShopTalk, Dave and I spoke with Mandy Michael and Lara Schenck. Mandy had just written the intentionally provocative “Is there any value in people who cannot write JavaScript?” which guided our conversation. Lara is deeply interested in this subject as well, as someone who is a job seeking web worker, but places herself on the spectrum as a non-unicorn.

Part of that discussion was about job titles. If there was a ubiquitously accepted and used …


Getting Nowhere on Job Titles is a post from CSS-Tricks

The Art of Comments

I believe commenting code is important. Most of all, I believe commenting is misunderstood. I tweeted out the other day that “I hear conflicting opinions on whether or not you should write comments. But I get thank you’s from junior devs for writing them so I’ll continue.” The responses I received were varied, but what caught my eye was that for every person agreeing that commenting was necessary, they all had different reasons for believing this.

Commenting is a more …


The Art of Comments is a post from CSS-Tricks

Prettier + Stylelint: Writing Very Clean CSS (Or, Keeping Clean Code is a Two-Tool Game)

It sure is nice having a whole codebase that is perfectly compliant to a set of code style guidelines. All the files use the same indentation, the same quote style, the same spacing and line-break rules, heck, tiny things like the way zero’s in values are handled and how keyframes are named.

It seems like a tall order, but these days, it’s easier than ever. It seems to me it’s become a two-tool game:

  1. A tool to automatically fix easy-to-fix


Prettier + Stylelint: Writing Very Clean CSS (Or, Keeping Clean Code is a Two-Tool Game) is a post from CSS-Tricks

On-Site Search

CSS-Tricks is a WordPress site. WordPress has a built-in search feature, but it isn’t tremendously useful. I don’t blame it, really. Search is a product onto itself and WordPress is a CMS company, not a search company.

You know how you can make a really powerful search engine for your site?

Here you go:

<form action="https://google.com/search" target="_blank" type="GET">

<input type=”search” name=”q”>
<input type=”submit” value=”search”>

</form>

Just a smidge of JavaScript trickery to enforce the site it searches:

var form


On-Site Search is a post from CSS-Tricks

A Look Back at the History of CSS

When you think of HTML and CSS, you probably imagine them as a package deal. But for years after Tim Berners-Lee first created the World Wide Web in 1989, there was no such thing as CSS. The original plan for the web offered no way to style a website at all.

There’s a now-infamous post buried in the archives of the WWW mailing list. It was written by Marc Andreessen in 1994, who would go on to co-create both the …


A Look Back at the History of CSS is a post from CSS-Tricks

Building a Progress Ring, Quickly

On some particularly heavy sites, the user needs to see a visual cue temporarily to indicate that resources and assets are still loading before they taking in a finished site. There are different kinds of approaches to solving for this kind of UX, from spinners to skeleton screens.

If we are using an out-of-the-box solution that provides us the current progress, like preloader package by Jam3 does, building a loading indicator becomes easier.

For this, we will make a …


Building a Progress Ring, Quickly is a post from CSS-Tricks

Exploring Data with Serverless and Vue: Automatically Update GitHub Files With Serverless Functions

I work on a large team with amazing people like Simona Cotin, John Papa, Jessie Frazelle, Burke Holland, and Paige Bailey. We all speak a lot, as it’s part of a developer advocate’s job, and we’re also frequently asked where we’ll be speaking. For the most part, we each manage our own sites where we list all of this speaking, but that’s not a very good experience for people trying to explore, so I made a demo that makes it …


Exploring Data with Serverless and Vue: Automatically Update GitHub Files With Serverless Functions is a post from CSS-Tricks

Exploring Data with Serverless and Vue: Filtering and Using the Data

In this second article of this tutorial, we’ll take the data we got from our serverless function and use Vue and Vuex to disseminate the data, update our table, and modify the data to use in our WebGL globe. This article assumes some base knowledge of Vue. By far the coolest/most useful thing we’ll address in this article is the use of the computed properties in Vue.js to create the performant filtering of the table. Read on!

Article Series:


Exploring Data with Serverless and Vue: Filtering and Using the Data is a post from CSS-Tricks

You can get pretty far in making a slider with just HTML and CSS

A “slider”, as in, a bunch of boxes set in a row that you can navigate between. You know what a slider is. There are loads of features you may want in a slider. Just as one example, you might want the slider to be swiped or scrolled. Or, you might not want that, and to have the slider only respond to click or tappable buttons that navigate to slides. Or you might want both. Or you might want to …


You can get pretty far in making a slider with just HTML and CSS is a post from CSS-Tricks