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Browser painting and considerations for web performance

The process of a web browser turning HTML, CSS, and JavaScript into a finished visual representation is quite complex and involves a good bit of magic. Here’s a simplified set of steps the browser goes through:

  1. Browser creates the DOM and CSSOM.
  2. Browser creates the render tree, where the DOM and styles from the CSSOM are taken into account (display: none elements are avoided).
  3. Browser computes the geometry of the layout and its elements based on the render tree.

The post Browser painting and considerations for web performance appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

A Short History of WaSP and Why Web Standards Matter

In August of 2013, Aaron Gustafson posted to the WaSP blog. He had a bittersweet message for a community that he had helped lead:

Thanks to the hard work of countless WaSP members and supporters (like you), Tim Berners-Lee’s vision of the web as an open, accessible, and universal community is largely the reality. While there is still work to be done, the sting of the WaSP is no longer necessary. And so it is time for us to …


A Short History of WaSP and Why Web Standards Matter is a post from CSS-Tricks

Secure Contexts Everywhere

Anne van Kesteren for Mozilla says:

Effective immediately, all new features that are web-exposed are to be restricted to secure contexts. Web-exposed means that the feature is observable from a web page or server, whether through JavaScript, CSS, HTTP, media formats, etc. A feature can be anything from an extension of an existing IDL-defined object, a new CSS property, a new HTTP response header, to bigger features such as WebVR. In contrast, a new CSS color keyword would likely not …


Secure Contexts Everywhere is a post from CSS-Tricks

A Sliding Nightmare: Understanding the Range Input

You may have already seen a bunch of tutorials on how to style the range input. While this is another article on that topic, it’s not about how to get any specific visual result. Instead, it dives into browser inconsistencies, detailing what each does to display that slider on the screen. Understanding this is important because it helps us have a clear idea about whether we can make our slider look and behave consistently across browsers and which styles are …


A Sliding Nightmare: Understanding the Range Input is a post from CSS-Tricks

A Sliding Nightmare: Understanding the Range Input

You may have already seen a bunch of tutorials on how to style the range input. While this is another article on that topic, it’s not about how to get any specific visual result. Instead, it dives into browser inconsistencies, detailing what each does to display that slider on the screen. Understanding this is important because it helps us have a clear idea about whether we can make our slider look and behave consistently across browsers and which styles are …


A Sliding Nightmare: Understanding the Range Input is a post from CSS-Tricks