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The State of Changing Gradients with CSS Transitions and Animations

Back in 2012, Internet Explorer 10 came out and, among other things, it finally supported CSS gradients and, in addition to that, the ability to animate them with just CSS! No other browser supported this at the time, but I was hopeful for the future.

Sadly, six years have passed and nothing has changed in this department. Edge supports animating gradients with CSS, just like IE 10 did back then, but no other browser has added support for this. And …

The post The State of Changing Gradients with CSS Transitions and Animations appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

1 Element CSS Rainbow Gradient Infinity

I first got the idea to CSS something of the kind when I saw this gradient infinity logo by Infographic Paradise. The gradient doesn’t look like in the original illustration, as I chose to generate the rainbow logically instead of using the Dev Tools picker or something like that, but other than that, I think I got pretty close—let’s see how I did that!

The post 1 Element CSS Rainbow Gradient Infinity appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Animating Progress

Jonathan Snook on the complexity of animating the <progress> element. If you’re unfamiliar, that’s the element that spits out a bar chart-like visual that indicates a position between two values:

This example has custom styles, but you get the point.

Jonathan’s post shows off a method for animating a change in progress value using CSS and a touch of JavaScript while making sure that it animates properly in every modern browser. The demo he made looks pretty neat. I’m sure …

The post Animating Progress appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Making CSS Animations Feel More Natural

It used to be that designers designed and coders coded. There was no crossover, and that’s the way it was. But with the advent of CSS transitions and animations, those lines are blurring a bit. It’s no longer as simple as the designer dictating the design and the coder transcribing—designers must now know something about code, and coders must know something about design in order to effectively collaborate.

As an example, let’s say a designer asks a developer …


Making CSS Animations Feel More Natural is a post from CSS-Tricks

Making CSS Animations Feel More Natural

It used to be that designers designed and coders coded. There was no crossover, and that’s the way it was. But with the advent of CSS transitions and animations, those lines are blurring a bit. It’s no longer as simple as the designer dictating the design and the coder transcribing—designers must now know something about code, and coders must know something about design in order to effectively collaborate.

As an example, let’s say a designer asks a developer …


Making CSS Animations Feel More Natural is a post from CSS-Tricks