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Musings on HTTP/2 and Bundling

HTTP/2 has been one of my areas of interest. In fact, I’ve written a few articles about it just in the last year. In one of those articles I made this unchecked assertion:

If the user is on HTTP/2: You’ll serve more and smaller assets. You’ll avoid stuff like image sprites, inlined CSS, and scripts, and concatenated style sheets and scripts.

I wasn’t the only one to say this, though, in all fairness to Rachel, she qualifies her assertion …


Musings on HTTP/2 and Bundling is a post from CSS-Tricks

ES6 modules support lands in browsers: is it time to rethink bundling?

Modules, as in, this kind of syntax right in JavaScript:

import { myCounter, someOtherThing } from 'utilities';

Which we’d normally use Webpack to bundle, but now is supported in Safari Technology Preview, Firefox Nightly (flag), and Edge.

It’s designed to support progressive enhancement, as you can safely link to a bundled version and a non-bundled version without having browsers download both.

Stefan Judis shows:

<!-- in case ES6 modules are supported -->
<script src="app/index.js" type="module"></script>
<!-- in case ES6 modules


ES6 modules support lands in browsers: is it time to rethink bundling? is a post from CSS-Tricks

HTTP/2 – A Real-World Performance Test and Analysis

Perhaps you’ve heard of HTTP/2? It’s not just an idea, it’s a real technology and slowly but surely, hosting companies and CDN services have been releasing it to their servers. Much has been said about the benefits of using HTTP/2 instead of HTTP1.x, but the proof the the pudding is in the eating.

Today we’re going to perform a few real-world tests, perform some timings and see what results we can extract out of all this.

Why HTTP/2?

If you …


HTTP/2 – A Real-World Performance Test and Analysis is a post from CSS-Tricks

Modernizing our Progressive Enhancement Delivery

Scott Jehl, explaining one of the performance improvements he made to the Filament Group site:

Inlining is a measurably-worthwhile workaround, but it’s still a workaround. Fortunately, HTTP/2’s Server Push feature brings the performance benefits of inlining without sacrificing cacheability for each file. With Server Push, we can respond to requests for a particular file by immediately sending additional files we know that file depends upon. In other words, the server can respond to a request for `index.html` with `index.html`, `css/site.css`, …


Modernizing our Progressive Enhancement Delivery is a post from CSS-Tricks