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​Task management has never been easier

(This is a sponsored post.)

monday.com is a team management tool that is exceptionally suitable for any industry sector and by any sized team. It will perfectly serve a team of two or a team of hundreds spread around the globe, and it can manage multiple projects at once.

monday.com promotes effortless collaboration and transparency, it’s “cheetah fast,” it displays status in as many as 20 different colors, and its status board can be customized to fit your needs …

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Seriously, though. What is a progressive web app?

Amberley Romo read a ton about PWAs in order to form her own solid understanding.

“Progressive web app” (PWA) is both a general term for a new philosophy toward building websites and a specific term with an established set of three explicit, testable, baseline requirements.

As a general term, the PWA approach is characterized by striving to satisfy the following set of attributes:

  1. Responsive
  2. Connectivity independent
  3. App-like-interactions
  4. Fresh
  5. Safe
  6. Discoverable
  7. Re-engageable
  8. Installable
  9. Linkable

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Firefox Multi-Account Containers

It’s an extension:

Each Container stores cookies separately, so you can log into the same site with different accounts and online trackers can’t easily connect the browsing.

A great idea for a feature if you ask me. For example, I have two Buffer accounts and my solution is to use different browsers entirely to stay logged into both of them. I know plenty of folks that prefer the browser version of apps like Notion, Front, and Twitter

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Creating the “Perfect” CSS System

My pal Lindsay Grizzard wrote about creating a CSS system that works across an organization and all of the things to keep in mind when starting a new project:

Getting other developers and designers to use the standardized rules is essential. When starting a project, get developers onboard with your CSS, JS and even HTML conventions from the start. Meet early and often to discuss every library, framework, mental model, and gem you are interested in using and take feedback …

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Understanding why Semantic HTML is important, as told by TypeScript

What a great technological analogy by Mandy Michael. A reminder that TypeScript…

makes use of static typing so, for example, you can give your variables a type when you write your code and then TypeScript checks the types at compile time and will throw an error if the variable is given a value of a different type.

In other words, you have a variable age that you declare to be a number, the value for age has to stay …

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The Cost of JavaScript in 2018

Even though we mentioned it earlier, I thought this outstanding post by Addy Osmani all about the performance concerns of JavaScript was still worth digging into a little more.

In that post, Addy touches on all aspects of perf work and how we can fix some of the most egregious issues, from setting up a budget to “Time-to-Interactive” measurements and auditing your JavaScript bundles.

Embrace performance budgets and learn to live within them. For mobile, aim for a JS budget …

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Short note on the accessibility of styled form controls

Styling and accessibility are often at odds with each other. Scott O’Hara has this repo that shows how the two can work really well together in the context of form controls.

The trade-offs between native and styled controls reminds me of Eric Bailey’s case study on focus styles:

A common misconception is that the focus style can only use the outline property. It’s worth noting that :focus is a selector like any other, meaning that it accepts the full …

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Chrome 69

Chrome 69 is notable for us CSS developers:

  • Conic gradients (i.e. background: conic-gradient(red, green, blue);): We’ve got lots of interesting articles about conic gradients here, and here’s some use cases and a polyfill from Lea Verou.
  • Logical box model properties: margin, padding, and border all get an upgrade for more use cases. Think of how we have margin-left now — the “left” part doesn’t make much sense when we switch directions. Now, we’ll have margin-inline-start for

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Framer X

Framer X is a brand new app that’s about to be released and this quick demo reel takes us on a tour through some of the changes to the previous app—it all looks super exciting.

As a designer, I’m most interested in the prototyping tools and being able to quickly explore complex scene transitions between one state and another. But as a developer, I’m interested in how it all ties into React. The website describes it like so:

Use actual …

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Getting to Know a Legacy Codebase

Harry Roberts talks about some methods for getting comfy with a new (“specifically CSS”) code base. Harry’s done this a lot as someone who parachutes into new code bases regularly as a consultant. But I think this is also quite interesting for people starting a new job. So much web development work is working on existing sites, not green fielding new ones.

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