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The Cost of JavaScript in 2018

Even though we mentioned it earlier, I thought this outstanding post by Addy Osmani all about the performance concerns of JavaScript was still worth digging into a little more.

In that post, Addy touches on all aspects of perf work and how we can fix some of the most egregious issues, from setting up a budget to “Time-to-Interactive” measurements and auditing your JavaScript bundles.

Embrace performance budgets and learn to live within them. For mobile, aim for a JS budget …

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Slow Websites

The web has grown bigger. Both in expansiveness and weight. Nick Heer’s “The Bullshit Web”:

The average internet connection in the United States is about six times as fast as it was just ten years ago, but instead of making it faster to browse the same types of websites, we’re simply occupying that extra bandwidth with more stuff.

Nick clearly explains what he means by bullshit, and one can see a connection to Brad Frost’s similarly framed

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Browser painting and considerations for web performance

The process of a web browser turning HTML, CSS, and JavaScript into a finished visual representation is quite complex and involves a good bit of magic. Here’s a simplified set of steps the browser goes through:

  1. Browser creates the DOM and CSSOM.
  2. Browser creates the render tree, where the DOM and styles from the CSSOM are taken into account (display: none elements are avoided).
  3. Browser computes the geometry of the layout and its elements based on the render tree.

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Using Custom Fonts With SVG in an Image Tag

When we produce a PNG image, we use an <img> tag or a CSS background, and that’s about it. It is dead simple and guaranteed to work.

PNG is way simpler to use in HTML than SVG

Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for SVG, despite its many advantages. Although you’re spoiled for choices when using SVG in HTML, it really boils down to inline, <object> and <img>, all with serious gotchas and trade-offs.

Problems with inline SVG…

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The web can be anything we want it to be

I really enjoyed this chat between Bruce Lawson and Mustafa Kurtuldu where they talked about browser support and the health of the web. Bruce expands upon a lot of the thoughts in a post he wrote last year called World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web where he writes:

…across the world, regardless of disposable income, regardless of hardware or network speed, people want to consume the same kinds of goods and services. And if your websites are made for …

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Hey hey `font-display`

Y’all know about font-display? It’s pretty great. It’s a CSS property that you can use within @font-face blocks to control how, visually, that font loads. Font loading is really pretty damn complicated. Here’s a guide from Zach Leatherman to prove it, which includes over 10 font loading strategies, including strategies that involve critical inline CSS of subsets of fonts combined with loading the rest of the fonts later through JavaScript. It ain’t no walk in the park.

Using font-display

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Chrome DevTools “Local Overrides”

There’s been two really interesting videos released recently that use the “Local Overrides” feature of Chrome DevTools in order to play with web performance without even touching the original source code.

The big idea is that you can literally edit CSS and reload the page and your changes stick. Meaning you can use the other performance testing tools …

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Three Techniques for Performant Custom Font Usage

There’s a lot of good news in the world of web fonts!

  1. The forthcoming version of Microsoft Edge will finally implement unicode-range, the last modern browser to do so.
  2. Preload and font-display are landing in Safari and Firefox.
  3. Variable fonts are shipping everywhere.

Using custom fonts in a performant way is becoming far easier. Let’s take a peek at some things we can do when using custom fonts to make sure we’re being as performant as we can be.…

The post Three Techniques for Performant Custom Font Usage appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Third-Party Scripts

Trent Walton:

My latest realization is that delivering a performant, accessible, responsive, scalable website isn’t enough: I also need to consider the impact of third-party scripts. No matter how solid I think my prototype is, it doesn’t absolve me from paying attention to what happens during implementation, specifically when it comes to the addition of these third-party scripts.

I recently had a conversation with a friend working on quite a high profile e-commerce site. They were hired to develop …


Third-Party Scripts is a post from CSS-Tricks

Front-End Performance Checklist

Vitaly Friedman swings wide with a massive list of performance considerations. It’s a well-considered mix of old tactics (cutting the mustard, progressive enhancement, etc.) and newer considerations (tree shaking, prefetching, etc.). I like the inclusion of a quick wins section since so much can be done for little effort; it’s important to do those things before getting buried in more difficult performance tasks.

Speaking of considering performance, Philip Walton recently dug into what interactive actually means, in a world …


Front-End Performance Checklist is a post from CSS-Tricks