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​Edit your website, from your website is a post from CSS-Tricks

A Collection of Interesting Facts about CSS Grid Layout

A few weeks ago I held a CSS Grid Layout workshop. Since I’m, like most of us, also pretty new to the topic, I learned a lot while preparing the slides and demos.
I decided to share some of the stuff that was particularly interesting to me, with you.

Have fun!

Negative values lower than -1 may be used for grid-row-end and grid-column-end

In a lot of code examples and tutorials you will see that you can use grid-column-start:


A Collection of Interesting Facts about CSS Grid Layout is a post from CSS-Tricks

How to Easily Add Custom Code in WordPress (without Breaking Your Site)

Often while reading WordPress tutorials, you may be asked to add custom code snippets in your theme’s functions.php file or in a site-specific plugin. The problem is that even a slightest mistake can break your website. In this article, we will show you an easy… Read More »

The post How to Easily Add Custom Code in WordPress (without Breaking Your Site) appeared first on WPBeginner.

13 Crucial WordPress Maintenance Tasks to Perform Regularly

Ever wondered which WordPress maintenance tasks you should be performing regularly? After starting a blog, often users don’t perform maintenance checks unless something breaks. By running regular maintenance tasks, you can make sure that your WordPress site is always performing at its best. In this… Read More »

The post 13 Crucial WordPress Maintenance Tasks to Perform Regularly appeared first on WPBeginner.

How to Display Recent Posts From A Specific Category In WordPress

Do you want to display recent posts from a specific category in WordPress? The default recent posts widget shows posts from all categories, and there is no option to filter them by category. In this article, we will show you how to easily display recent… Read More »

The post How to Display Recent Posts From A Specific Category In WordPress appeared first on WPBeginner.

6 Top WordPress Theme Marketplaces to Find the Best Themes

We are often asked by our users where can they find the best WordPress themes? In particular, which WordPress theme marketplaces or theme shops is the best? There are actually so many great themes out there that most beginners feel a bit overwhelmed by the… Read More »

The post 6 Top WordPress Theme Marketplaces to Find the Best Themes appeared first on WPBeginner.

Transitioning Gradients

Keith J. Grant:

In CSS, you can’t transition a background gradient. It jumps from one gradient to the other immediately, with no smooth transition between the two.

He documents a clever tactic of positioning a pseudo element covering the element with a different background and transitioning the opacity of that pseudo element. You also need a little z-index trickery to ensure any content inside stays visible.

Gosh, I remember a time not so long ago pseudo elements weren’t transitionable!

I …


Transitioning Gradients is a post from CSS-Tricks

(Now More Than Ever) You Might Not Need jQuery

The DOM and native browser API’s have improved by leaps and bounds since jQuery’s release all the way back in 2006. People have been writing “You Might Not Need jQuery” articles since 2013 (see this classic site and this classic repo). I don’t want to rehash old territory, but a good bit has changed in browser land since the last You Might Not Need jQuery article you might have stumbled upon. Browsers continue to implement new APIs that take …


(Now More Than Ever) You Might Not Need jQuery is a post from CSS-Tricks

Net Neutraility

I’m linking up a “call to action” style site here as it’s nicely done and explain the situation fairly well. Right now, there are rules (in the United States) against internet providers prioritizing speed and access on a site-by-site basis. If they could, they probably would, and that’s straight up bad for the internet.

In other “good for the internet” news… does my site need HTTPS?

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Net Neutraility is a post from CSS-Tricks